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Value of 1914 Red Seal Federal Reserve Notes

1914 Red Seal Federal Reserve Notes

Series of 1914 red seals were issued as Federal Reserve Notes for a brief period of time before World War I.  This issue is sometimes mistakenly called a series of 1913 note due to the fact that “Authorized by Federal Reserve Act of December 23, 1913″ is written on each note.  Despite that, these are still from the series of 1914.  Keep in mind that were no star notes issued for this series.  Blue seal 1914 notes were printed directly after the red seals.  There was once a rumor that the color was changed because red ink was needed for the war.  However, that idea has since been disproved.  If you have some specific questions about your red seal, please ask.  Sales@AntiqueMoney.com

1914 red seal five dollar notes are the most available denomination for the series.  These are most often seen from New York (so the serial number begins with the letter B).  Abraham Lincoln is featured at the center of each note.  Low serial number notes are known to exist from most denominations.  Because these are relatively common, condition becomes very important when trying to determine an accurate value.

Series of 1914 red seal ten dollar bills have a portrait of Andrew Jackson at the center of each bill.  

Traditionally speaking, a higher denomination like a $20 bill is scarcer than something lower like a five or a ten.  However, for the 1914 red seal series the $20 note is available just as frequently.  Choice uncirculated examples are much more difficult to locate for the twenty than for the five or ten.

The fifty dollar denomination 1914 red seal with Ulysses Grant at front center is rarely encountered in high grades.  The issuing district is especially important on $50 notes.  You can determine the issuing district by reading the black federal reserve seal or by matching the first letter of the serial number to the corresponding district.  Not many of these were printed, so low serial numbers are available.  Any number under 100 should command a premium.

The most popular 1914 red seal is likely the Benjamin Franklin $100 bill.  Even in low grades these still have a striking eye appeal.  These are available in heavily circulated condition.  However, these are very scarce and valuable in choice uncirculated condition.